QUOTE OF THE MONTH: Hope never dies within a true gardener’s heart. - Unknown

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Sunday, 31 January 2016

Beautiful Pansies

The winter season here has one speciality, the seasonal flowers available in the winter season are just a treat for the eyes, and not because of the numbers or varieties, even their colours makes one drool for more of them. Beautiful and colourful flowers have always attracted me towards them, and that is one reason I have always tried bringing in new varieties of beautiful flowering plants in my garden. As such, I have been trying to get my hands on some of these, and some of these like Dahlias, Phloxes, etc have been a regular feature in my garden during the winter season for quite some time now, I never could manage to get petunias and pansies as these feature among the most beautiful offerings of the winter season.

Metro Greens: Yellow Pansy flower bud
Yellow pansy bud
Metro Greens: Maroon Pansy flower
Maroon pansy flower
Metro Greens: Maroon Pansy flower
Maroon pansy flower
This time around, however, I managed to get some saplings of petunias and pansies from the plants nursery nearby, thus, making sure that my winter garden will no longer be devoid of some beautiful colours of these astonishingly beautiful flowers, all of which, in full bloom resemble beautiful and large butterflies with their contrasting colours and amazing patterns in their petals. What's more beautiful about these small plants is the fact that owing to their small size, these can be planted in very small pots, and placed over window sills, balconies and even on walls.

Metro Greens: Yellow Pansy flower
Yellow pansy flower
Metro Greens: Maroon Pansy flower
Maroon pansy flower

The plants are hardy in nature and not much care is required by these plants and are pretty much happy with good amount of sunlight, have moderate watering requirements. It's good to have a good amount of organic content for a fertile and rich soil for almost any flowering plant to bear good flowers and to that pansies are no exception. Another good thing about these plants is that the flowers can stay anywhere between four to five days depending upon the intensity of sunlight, and thus, Pansies are loved a lot for brightening up urban homes during the winter season.
Coming up next week will be blooms from the marguerite daisies and gerberas too, the following week. The strawberries too are in blooms and these too deserve a post dedicated to them, irrespective of whether I am able to grow any strawberries. With that, I guess it's time to wrap up. I will be back next week with updates, till then HAPPY GARDENING!

Monday, 18 January 2016

The Black Rose

As a gardener, I take a keen interest in my hobby of gardening, and it was for this, I started getting plants, and started gardening in containers and pots on the rooftop of my house, since I do not have access to open land so that I could do what I want to my complete satisfaction. Though I like all kinds of plants, that could be grown in pots, I particularly, am very fond of flowers, and when it comes to flowers, roses are counted as my most favourites. Even when I take a look at the composition of my garden, different varieties of roses make the most of what my potted garden is composed of. The regular red rose, fragrant and red, some other hybrid and tea roses, for which, I never could know the cultivars, since I have never bought from the high-end plant sellers and rose breeders, so, it's obvious that the local plant seller (in most of the cases in India), won't know the variety they are selling to us. Frankly, I never cared much about their varieties/cultivars too much as long as they provide me with beautiful blooms once in a while.
The collection is still growing, with me having a number of roses ranging from orange, two different shades of pink, miniature roses in creamy-white and red-orange-yellow, yellow, red and black. I have been getting plants from far-away places, and in this series, I recently brought two more roses, a yellow one and a black one, both hybrids. Both the plants have been re-potted and are doing well in their individual pots. This is to say that both of them are showing good enough signs of growth, with new lateral branches and new shoots coming up in both of them.

While the yellow one is yet to bloom, having concentrated its energy on growing rather than blooming, the black one chose to bloom simultaneously, while growing up as well. In this post, I will be sharing with you, a few pictures of this black rose, which recently bloomed up in the garden.  

Metro Greens: Black Rose
Black rose bud
Metro Greens: Black Rose
Black rose bud
Metro Greens: Black Rose
Black rose bud
Metro Greens: Black Rose
Black rose bud
While the bloom came up, I was partly disheartened because of the colour of the bloom, which, instead of being black was of a darker shade of red. While I was expecting a black rose, or atleast one that could be called “black”, appears there is no concept of black coloured roses (except for one Turkish variety, which apparently is actually, black in colour), and so, I think, I have got a “black rose”. Nonetheless, what bloomed up was a rose flower with a very mild fragrance of a rose, and this was somewhat enough for me.
Most of the marguerite daisy plants have been profusely, and the phloxes too, are blooming now, and so is the pansy and petunias. Coming up next will be something from among these new additions. Till then, HAPPY GARDENING! 

Monday, 11 January 2016

Chrys-n-the-mum

The month long season of chrysanthemum has finally come to an end. For the whole month, I relished the beauty of these wonderful flowers, was subject to different stages of their bloom, which, at times made me marvel over the varieties, nature has to offer us. A single flower, from budding to blooming travels through various stages which can easily dupe a non-gardener into believing that these all are different flowers altogether.
Today, I am here to share some handpicked clicks from dozens of clicks I took through the entire season, so that we could all relish the beauty of these flowers, hoping to see more of these beauties in the next season. Chrysanthemums, for their beauty, are an absolute delight to have in your garden, and having them in different colours, shapes and sizes, and varieties, is an absolute delight for any gardener, I think. Maybe, this is one of the reasons different varieties of chrysanthemums are used for a dozen of different purposes ranging from flower arrangements to garlands, and offerings to deities to bouquets. Though, not very fragrant flowers, the beauty of these flowers overpowers their lack of fragrance, and hence, these regularly feature as top favourites throughout the year.


Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: Orange Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: Orange Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: Orange Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Metro Greens: White Chrysanthemum

Over the course of weeks and days, the new entrants in my potted garden have grown bigger and healthier. The black rose that I brought in, has started blooming. The marguerite daisies I shared with you have started budding, and also the pansies have started blooming. Did I share with you, the strawberries? No? Okay, the strawberry plants too have started blooming. Hopefully I will have some homegrown strawberries to share with you all in the coming weeks. But before that, I am very sure I will be having some gerberas blooming, and the phloxes too, and did I mention the pink dahlia I had last year? I too stood its ground throughout the year this time, and will also be blooming, in a month or so. Hopefully, I will be taking you through some of these new additions in the garden in the coming weeks. Till then, HAPPY GARDENING! 

Wednesday, 30 December 2015

Growing the flower bearers

Last winter, out of my habit, I had collected some seeds of marguerite daisy flowers while in a public park. While the flowers had withered away there, I knew that these seeds were to come in handy in this winter, as were the seeds of nasturtiums that I saved from the plants I had got last year. In the end of October, this winter, I had sown the seeds and then waited patiently for these seeds to germinate. Within a week, the seeds started germinating and seeing the hundreds of seedlings in the pot, I regained the faith in my hands, and the potted soil I have on the rooftop. Seeing this new development from this perspective, it is a huge motivating factor for someone.

Metro Greens: The newly germinated marguerite daisy seeds - at 7 days from sowing the seeds.
The newly germinated seeds - at 7 days from sowing the seeds.
Metro Greens: The newly germinated marguerite daisy seedlings - at 10 days from sowing the seeds.
The newly germinated seedlings - at 10 days from sowing the seeds.
Metro Greens: The newly germinated marguerite daisy seedlings - at 10 days from sowing the seeds.
The newly germinated seedlings - at 10 days from sowing the seeds.
Over the time, these seedlings have grown up to be health plants. Some were transplanted to other pots, for the sake of these becoming healthy plants, and also, for spreading this burst of flowers when they all start blooming finally, throughout the garden.

Metro Greens: The marguerite daisy saplings, ready to be transplanted - at 21 days from sowing the seeds.
The saplings, ready to be transplanted - at 21 days from sowing the seeds.
Metro Greens: The marguerite daisy saplings, good enough to be transplanted - at 26 days from sowing the seeds.
The saplings, still good enough to be transplanted - at 26 days from sowing the seeds.
Metro Greens: The marguerite daisy saplings, have now become plants - at around 38 days from sowing the seeds.
The saplings, have now become plants - at around 38 days from sowing the seeds.
Metro Greens: The now well developed plants of marguerite daisies, still growing up - at 50 days from sowing the seeds. Now the plants are not that fit to be transplanted, if tried, the success rate will be very low.
The now well developed plants, still growing up - at 50 days from sowing the seeds. Now the plants are not that fit to be transplanted, if tried, the success rate will be very low.
Now, the plants have grown quite well, and so many of them have come up that I can plant an entire lawn and stiill be left with a lof of plants, but I am limited to my own rooftop for I do not own a piece of land where I could sown them to relish the beauty of these flowers on land I have tilled myself, but then the hope is not lost, and hence I still have been trying to grow fruit trees like one mango, a pomegranate, and another one of a lime, all in pots, so that when the opportunity strikes, I could go out with my hands full and do as what my heart says.
The chrysanthemum blooms too are at their peak, so, hopefully I will be sharing these pretty flowers in dozens, as the first post in the new year. Till then, HAPPY GARDENING and a very HAPPY NEW YEAR!